EoE Data Innovation Showcase

EoE Citizen Science Themes

Food Waste
Solutions

Winner & Finalists

The Opportunity

The global food system is the greatest cause of biodiversity loss as inefficiently used water and land leads to diminished natural ecosystems and the services they provide. Reducing the amount of food that is wasted has significant environmental, economic and food security impacts. At the nexus of Sustainable Development Goals 2 and 11, sustainable agriculture and food security has a positive effect on preserving biodiversity and terrestrial ecosystems. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) have made food loss and waste a priority with the Think. Eat. Save. Campaign, the issue is part of the Zero Hunger Challenge global call to action of the UN Secretary General.

Background

Approximately one-third of all food produced worldwide, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. Approximately one out of every four calories grown to feed people is not ultimately consumed by humans. Food loss is an issue for producers through the harvesting, processing, storage, transport and marketing methods they use, and is a consumption and retail issue due to inefficient practices, overly emphasized appearance standards, confusion over labels, and unsustainable consumer patterns of purchasing and storing food.

The Challenge

We are seeking novel technology, tools and applications to identify where and how food is being wasted at the retail and consumption levels and food loss at the post-harvest level. Projects may provide ways to make data accessible to the end user - consumers, private sector, smallholder farmers, or increase public awareness on the uses of open data to solve food waste challenges.

We will consider project ideas with relevant solutions in these areas

  • Devices: Devices that use or convey data on food quality and safety.
  • Software: Novel software that facilitates crowdsourcing and sharing of food waste data.
  • Hardware: New, cost effective and scalable technology that can can collect, analyze and release food waste and preservation data.
  • Other: A non-technological solution to collect, manage, or interpret food waste data.

Examples of project submissions we encourage

  • Technologies that weigh or calculate consumer food purchased and discarded, notifying of environmental and economic impact.
  • Retail food donation exchanges platform matching excess with need.
  • Data labelling innovations that incentify portion size reduction, provides clear consumer direction on food quality and safety.
  • Indicator technologies such as time and temperature monitoring devices that provide information relating to food product quality or safety.
  • Novel advances in data collection and technological interventions that address post-harvest loss.
  • Supply chain management tools and metrics to assess food quality along value chains.

Using Data to
Manage Forest
Degradation

Winner & Finalists

The Opportunity

Forests are a rich source of the Earth’s biodiversity that unfortunately are disappearing at an alarming rate due to increased global resource demand. The Rio+20 Sustainable Development Report calls for “increased efforts to strengthen forest governance frameworks and means of implementation”. Advances in technology have significantly improved our ability to observe and monitor forests. Data is crucial not only in monitoring, but in providing actionable information to support the areas of the world most affected by forest degradation.

Background

Nearly 50% of the world’s forests have been lost. Increased awareness of the issues of deforestation and forest degradation have led to increased investment and new international agreements around the issue. This has given way to increased protection and forest management efforts which have brought net gains in forest area in Europe and Asia and slowed forest loss globally. The ever increasing pool of datasets and recent improvements in satellite imagery offer new opportunities to combat deforestation and drive sustainable development.

The Challenge

We are seeking solutions that collect new forest data and solutions and use existing forest data to combat forest degradation. Examples of data include:

  • Forest Inventory Data
  • CO2 Emission Data
  • Geospatial and Land Use Data

We will consider project ideas with relevant solutions in these areas

  • Hardware: New, cost effective and scalable technology to improve forest monitoring or combat the effects of forest degradation.
  • Software: Novel software which sources new data or utilizes data to halt forest degradation.
  • Other: Other solutions that source new data or utilize data to combat forest degradation.

Examples of project submissions we encourage

  • A crowdsourced map using open data to do tree inventory.
  • A photo sharing app that maps local forests.
  • An app that allows landowners to estimate the forest carbon sequestration value of their land.
  • An app that combines forest cover data from satellite images with the ecological processes on the ground.

Biodiversity as
a Solution for
Resilient Cities

Winner & Finalists

The Opportunity

The Rio +20 Conference outcome “The Future We Want” recognized that cities can lead the way towards economically, socially and environmentally sustainable societies, but that a holistic approach to urban planning and management is needed. The scientific community has made defensible links between the health of the environment and every one of the social and economic goals we aim to achieve as a global society, and Sustainable Development Goal 11 resolves to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. Environmental data is needed to be both supplied and interpreted as a piece of this integrated approach to inform sustainable development. Understanding local environmental data is critical to decision-makers in communities and cities and valuable data are often not available. Improving how local environmental data is collected, managed and interpreted is critical to promoting resilient cities.

Background

Global urbanization trends are creating new challenges and opportunities for preserving our Earth’s biodiversity. By 2050 66% of the world’s population is projected to be urban, up from 30% in 1950 and 50% in 2014. While urbanization leads to biodiversity loss, many cities retain rich and diverse native biodiversity and efforts are being undertaken to promote it through local  projects like urban green spaces and community gardens. As urbanization continues, there is a need to understand how cities are interacting with natural ecosystems so informed decisions can be made by city and community planners.

The Challenge

We are seeking solutions that will improve existing mechanisms of collecting and managing local data to inform decisions concerning environmental infrastructure planning. Examples of data includes:

  • Local biodiversity classification
  • Local watershed data
  • Local tree species
  • Local air quality data
  • Geospatial & land use data

We will consider project ideas with relevant solutions in these areas

  • Hardware: New, cost effective and scalable technology that can can collect local environmental data.
  • Software: Novel software that facilitates crowdsourcing and sharing of local environmental data. Mapping applications that integrate local environmental data with land use
  • Other: A non-technological solution to collect, manage, or interpret local  environmental data.

Examples of project submissions we encourage

  • A tool or app that produces a map for any major global city identifying where green space would provide greatest benefits for biodiversity, air quality improvement and reduced heat island effects.
  • Citizen/education platforms that inform about local biodiversity and the value it provides
  • A tool or app to crowdsource local biodiversity classification and inventory.
  • A tool or app that tracks effects of climate change such as flowering, fruiting, and bird migration at the local level.